Michael Graves’s tour of Princeton

The architect, who died March 12 at his home in Princeton, N.J., was one of the most prominent nationally in his field. Michael Graves celebrated the 50th anniversary of his architecture and design firm in 2014. The Indianapolis native, pictured with his yellow labrador, Sara, in his Princeton studio in 2001, set down roots in the New Jersey university town. Jonathan Cohen/For The Washington Post

The architect, who died March 12 at his home in Princeton, N.J., was one of the most prominent nationally in his field.
Michael Graves celebrated the 50th anniversary of his architecture and design firm in 2014. The Indianapolis native, pictured with his yellow labrador, Sara, in his Princeton studio in 2001, set down roots in the New Jersey university town. Jonathan Cohen/For The Washington Post

Andrea Sachs, of The Washington Post, met for an interview with architect Michael Grave’s on March 4th. Prior to the interview, Mr. Graves sent on a list for favorite Princeton properties.

Partial List:

The Warehouse (44 Patton Ave.). My home, which was built in the 1920s by Italian stonemasons to house the belongings of Princeton students. I began renovating almost 40 years ago.

Albert Einstein House (112 Mercer St.). His home from 1936 until his death in 1955. The house was built in the mid-19th century and has been home to several Nobel Prize winners since. Einstein asked that it not be made into a museum or anything like that, so the home is still occupied and you cannot visit the interior.

Robeson Center (102 Witherspoon St.). Designed by Michael Graves & Associates.

Palmer Square (off Nassau Street). Conceived by Edgar Palmer, heir to the New Jersey Zinc Co. fortune, in 1929 and designed by Thomas Stapleton. The project was delayed until 1936 due to the Depression.

Yankee Doodle Tap Room (10 Palmer Sq.). The tap room, in the lower level of the Nassau Inn, is home to the largest Norman Rockwell mural in existence.

McCarter Theatre Center (91 University Pl.). I attend performances here on a regular basis throughout the year. It was built as a permanent home for the Princeton University Triangle Club. They continue to perform there to this day.

Woodrow Wilson’s homes. Woodrow Wilson had several homes in Princeton in addition to Prospect House. He lived in three additional homes. The first, at 72 Library Pl., was built by Charles Steadman in 1836. Then Wilson had architect Edward S. Child design the Tudor Revival house at 82 Library Pl. And, finally, he lived around the corner at 25 Cleveland Lane.

FULL LIST AND ARTICLE

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s