New Closings Prompts Release of Final Homes for Sale at Palmer Square in Downtown Princeton

Palmer Square Townhomes Exterior SMALL

THE RESIDENCES AT PALMER SQUARE IN DOWNTOWN PRINCETON

Four new closings ranging upwards of more than $2 million were recently recorded at The Residences at Palmer Square, downtown Princeton’s premier luxury residential development.

The new sales has prompted the developer to release the community’s final homes for sale — a move that will bring to fruition an historic plan to create a sophisticated lifestyle experience in one of the most unique and culturally-rich residential settings.

The flurry of new high-end sales activity demonstrates the market’s confidence in Princeton in general, and in The Residences at Palmer Square specifically.

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Downtown Princeton has long been viewed as a desirable place to live, thanks in large part to its comfortable, small-town existence that’s coupled with an urban vibrancy and international presence usually found in a big city. Its appeal grew exponentially with the continued development of Palmer Square. Today, the carefully-curated array of one-of-a-kind boutiques, brand name shops, great restaurants and open space situated directly across Nassau Street from Princeton University is the cornerstone of Princeton’s celebrated Downtown. Continue reading

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The Residences at Palmer Square Enjoys Location in America’s Top Small City, Financial Website Proclaims

Wallethub.com Ranks Princeton America’s #1 Small City

Palmer Square Townhomes Exterior SMALL

THE RESIDENCES AT PALMER SQUARE IN DOWNTOWN PRINCETON

PRINCETON, NJ – Downtown Princeton is globally recognized as a desirable place to live, shop and dine, but according to a recent analysis by a prominent financial website, it isn’t only an excellent small town, it is the best “Small City” in America.

Wallethub.com, a website dedicated to helping consumers and small businesses make better financial decisions, analyzed 1,268 municipalities in the U.S. with a population between 25,000 and 100,000 and ranked them based on various criteria. Princeton emerged with the best overall score after taking first in the nation for “economic health”, seventh for “education and health,” and 41st for “quality of life.”

The new accolade follows similar tributes for Princeton over the past year, including being named the “Best College Town to Live In” by the financial website Smartasset.com, and the designation of an “Age-Friendly Community” from the World Health Organization.

“Princeton’s pedestrian-friendly character and plethora of cultural and recreational resources and attractions make it one of the country’s most unique and desirable places to live,” said David Newton, Vice President of Palmer Square Management, which developed The Residences at Palmer Square, a community of upscale residences and boutique retail shops and restaurants directly across Nassau Street from Princeton University.  “It has certainly contributed to the overall appeal of our community and quality of life of our residents who are uniquely positioned to take advantage of it all. The energy of the downtown setting, combined with the luxury of the stately townhome and condominium residences, provides a compelling lifestyle proposition that has resonated with the public.”

The Residences at Palmer Square was conceived as part of a European-style town square for Princeton that would include shops, restaurants and residences as a complement to Princeton University. The community’s collection of homes is integrated into Palmer Square’s acclaimed collection of more than 40 brand-name stores, boutique shops, specialty food stores and restaurants.  The homes include a carefully-crafted array of multistory townhomes and single-level condominium flats that blend distinctive architectural designs with sophisticated living spaces. Designed by Minno & Wasko Architects and Planners of Lambertville, NJ, the residences feature a number of elevations which expertly complement the brick, Federal-style exteriors and Colonial-era structures of the immediate Palmer Square environment.

Two- and three-bedroom, single-level flats range from 1,623 to 3,195 square feet of living space, priced from $1,230,000. Multi-level, two- and three-bedroom townhomes with private street-level entrances range from 2,516 to 4,476 square feet and are priced from $1,825,000.

A limited offering of rental residences is also available, with one-, two- and three-bedroom floor plans ranging from 1,417 to 3,195 square feet of living space. The rental residences are available with monthly rents starting at $4,490.

Steel and concrete construction offers the highest level of quality and privacy, while terraces in many homes and promenades, courtyards and common areas offer desirable outdoor space.  Homeowners also enjoy indoor parking.

Custom interior features and appointments include private elevators and 10-foot first-floor ceiling heights in townhomes, nine-foot ceilings in condominiums, and tray ceilings in living and dining areas and master bedrooms. Extensive millwork, including striking fireplaces with marble hearths, pocket doors and elegant crown moldings, add style and elegance to the homes. Gourmet kitchens are notable for maple cabinets, granite countertops and Viking stainless steel appliance packages, while spa-like Master baths feature whirlpool tubs, double sinks, glass showers, and marble countertops.

Ideally situated across from the main entrance of Princeton University, Palmer Square allows residents to enjoy Princeton’s cherished suburban ambiance, award-winning public and private schools, renowned university attributes, and world-class entertainment and cultural offerings. NJ TRANSIT access to New York and Philadelphia (and beyond) is only a short walk from The Residences at Palmer Square, and businesses and shopping venues of the nearby Route 1 corridor are also within easy reach.

For additional information on The Residences at Palmer Square and to make a private appointment to view fully-furnished townhome and single-level model homes, please call 609-924-3884, or visit www.palmersquareresidences.com. The sales center hours are 10-6pm Monday through Friday, and 11am-5pm on Saturday and Sunday.  The sales center is located at 22 Paul Robeson Place in Princeton.

Modern Luxury Blends With Old World Charm at the Residences at Palmer Square in Downtown Princeton

via Michael Travin/ RESIDENT Magazine

A vision that began in the 1930s by Edgar Palmer to build a vibrant, European Style town square in the heart of Princeton that would include shops, restaurants and residences as a complement to Princeton University is in its final stages of completion.  A venture more than 75 years in the making is culminating with The Residences at Palmer Square, a collection of multi-story townhomes and single-level flats that are now more than 80% occupied.

The Residences at Palmer Square marks the coming of age of a project whose foundations were laid during the Great Depression and over the years has blossomed into one of the finest examples of a commercial downtown. Inspired by architect Thomas Stapleton’s original Colonial Revival design for Palmer Square, Minno & Wasko Architects and Planners of Lambertville, NJ helped make  the vision a reality by designing  a number of distinctive elevations that complement the brick, Federal-style exteriors and Colonial-era structures of the immediate Palmer Square environment. Many years of thoughtful planning has gone into creating the optimal balance of architectural styles and commercial and residential uses.

The unique energy and convenience of living at The Residences at Palmer Square stems from its prime location within Palmer Square, which is also home to more than 40 brand-name stores, boutiques, restaurants and specialty food shops, as well as the historic Nassau Inn.  The community is also located directly across Nassau Street from Princeton University, and provides easy access to the arts, entertainment, cultural offerings and award-winning schools throughout the area.  NJ TRANSIT access to New York and Philadelphia (and beyond) is only a short walk from The Residences at Palmer Square, and businesses and shopping venues of the nearby Route 1 corridor are also within easy reach. Continue reading

Princeton Music Gets a $10 Million Boost

via NJ.com

This aerial photograph shows progress on the arts complex construction site as of mid March 2015. (Photo by Aerial Photos of New Jersey)

This aerial photograph shows progress on the arts complex construction site as of mid March 2015. (Photo by Aerial Photos of New Jersey)

A Princeton University alumnus and his wife have anonymously donated $10 million for the 23,000-square-foot music building in the new arts complex currently under construction, university officials said Monday.

While the identity of the donors is currently being withheld at the request of the couple, the music building will eventually be named for the donors, the university said.

“This splendid gift will benefit our student musicians and the audiences who come to hear them,” President Christopher L. Eisgruber said in a statement. “The additional space is an essential element in enabling our arts initiative — launched less than a decade ago — to flourish. We are excited about seeing the arts at Princeton reach their full potential, and we are grateful to our generous alumni and friends for helping to make it possible.”

The music building at the $330 million arts and transit project will be home to the university’s Department of Music and the Lewis Center for the Arts. The building will “meet the urgent need for space and bring student musicians — and the music they create — to the south edge of the campus,” according to the university’s announcement.

The three-story building will include a performance and rehearsal space, acoustically advanced practice rooms and teaching studios, and a digital recording studio. Also under construction at the site are the Wallace Dance Building and Theater, and a Tower that will house faculty and administrative offices and an art gallery.

The anonymous donor was quoted in the announcement saying: “When my wife and I visited campus and witnessed the engagement, curiosity and passion of so many students in so many areas of arts study, the decision to be a part of the team in promoting the arts at Princeton was an easy one.”

Michael Graves’s tour of Princeton

The architect, who died March 12 at his home in Princeton, N.J., was one of the most prominent nationally in his field. Michael Graves celebrated the 50th anniversary of his architecture and design firm in 2014. The Indianapolis native, pictured with his yellow labrador, Sara, in his Princeton studio in 2001, set down roots in the New Jersey university town. Jonathan Cohen/For The Washington Post

The architect, who died March 12 at his home in Princeton, N.J., was one of the most prominent nationally in his field.
Michael Graves celebrated the 50th anniversary of his architecture and design firm in 2014. The Indianapolis native, pictured with his yellow labrador, Sara, in his Princeton studio in 2001, set down roots in the New Jersey university town. Jonathan Cohen/For The Washington Post

Andrea Sachs, of The Washington Post, met for an interview with architect Michael Grave’s on March 4th. Prior to the interview, Mr. Graves sent on a list for favorite Princeton properties.

Partial List:

The Warehouse (44 Patton Ave.). My home, which was built in the 1920s by Italian stonemasons to house the belongings of Princeton students. I began renovating almost 40 years ago.

Albert Einstein House (112 Mercer St.). His home from 1936 until his death in 1955. The house was built in the mid-19th century and has been home to several Nobel Prize winners since. Einstein asked that it not be made into a museum or anything like that, so the home is still occupied and you cannot visit the interior.

Robeson Center (102 Witherspoon St.). Designed by Michael Graves & Associates.

Palmer Square (off Nassau Street). Conceived by Edgar Palmer, heir to the New Jersey Zinc Co. fortune, in 1929 and designed by Thomas Stapleton. The project was delayed until 1936 due to the Depression.

Yankee Doodle Tap Room (10 Palmer Sq.). The tap room, in the lower level of the Nassau Inn, is home to the largest Norman Rockwell mural in existence.

McCarter Theatre Center (91 University Pl.). I attend performances here on a regular basis throughout the year. It was built as a permanent home for the Princeton University Triangle Club. They continue to perform there to this day.

Woodrow Wilson’s homes. Woodrow Wilson had several homes in Princeton in addition to Prospect House. He lived in three additional homes. The first, at 72 Library Pl., was built by Charles Steadman in 1836. Then Wilson had architect Edward S. Child design the Tudor Revival house at 82 Library Pl. And, finally, he lived around the corner at 25 Cleveland Lane.

FULL LIST AND ARTICLE

New Sales and Rental Activity Push Palmer Square to 80% Occupied in Downtown Princeton

Palmer Square is an office, retail and residential development near Princeton University. Photo: Taylor Photo

Palmer Square is an office, retail and residential development near Princeton University.
Photo: Taylor Photo

PRINCETON, NJ – The final piece of a grand development puzzle that has successfully delivered a vibrant and walkable downtown setting in Princeton is nearing completion with an impressive 80% of The Residences at Palmer Square now occupied.

The bespoke collection of residences, a carefully-crafted array of multi-story townhomes, single-level and duplex condominium flats and rental flats, is the culmination of a vision that originated in the early 1900s.  It was then that Edgar Palmer first conceived of the Square as a new municipal center with various buildings for retail, office and residential use; a hotel, post office and a playhouse that would all complement Princeton University, located directly across Nassau Street.   The first buildings were completed in 1937, and a new phase has been added every decade since.

“The vision was to create a commercial core of Princeton to complement the academic core, and in terms of ground-up development, the residences complete that vision,” said David Newton, Vice President of Palmer Square Management.

With Palmer Square’s charming collection of more than 40 brand-name stores, boutiques, restaurants and specialty food shops, as well as the historic Nassau Inn, successfully imbuing Princeton with the energy of an urban-inspired, downtown environment, the new residences provide the sought-after opportunity to live in the center of it all.

“The homes are exquisite and offer the privacy and quiet of an urban oasis, with lushly-landscaped promenades creating a picturesque buffer from the retail landscape, yet residents can easily walk to everything the Square and Princeton University have to offer,” Mr. Newton points out.  “It’s the type of active and convenient lifestyle many people are looking for today.”

In designing the homes, Minno & Wasko Architects and Planners took over where architect Thomas Stapleton’s original Colonial Revival style left off, with a number of distinctive elevations that complement the brick, Federal-style exteriors and Colonial-era structures of the immediate Palmer Square environment.

Palmer Square Townhome Living Room SMALLTwo- and three-bedroom, single-level flats range from 1,623 to 3,195 square feet of living space, priced from $1,590,000.  Multi-level, two- and three-bedroom townhomes range from 2,516 to 4,476 square feet and are priced from $1,640,000 to $2,950,000.

A limited collection of rental residences is also available, with two- and three-bedroom floor plans ranging from 1,417 to 3,195 square feet of living space.  The rental residences are available with monthly rents starting at $4,543.

Steel and concrete construction offers the highest level of quality and privacy, while terraces in many homes and promenades, courtyards and common areas offer desirable outdoor space.  Homeowners also enjoy indoor parking.

Custom interior features and appointments include private elevators and 10-foot first-floor ceiling heights in townhomes, nine-foot ceilings in condominiums, and tray ceilings in living and dining areas and master bedrooms.  Extensive millwork, including striking fireplaces with marble hearths, pocket doors and elegant crown moldings, add style and elegance to the homes.  Gourmet kitchens are notable for maple cabinets, granite countertops and Viking stainless steel appliance packages, while spa-like Master baths feature whirlpool tubs, double sinks, glass showers, and marble countertops.

Ideally situated across from the main entrance of Princeton University, Palmer Square allows residents to enjoy Princeton’s cherished suburban ambiance, award-winning public and private schools, renowned university attributes, and world-class entertainment and cultural offerings.  NJ TRANSIT access to New York and Philadelphia (and beyond) is only a short walk from The Residences at Palmer Square, and businesses and shopping venues of the nearby Route 1 corridor are also within easy reach.

For additional information on The Residences at Palmer Square and to make a private appointment to view fully-furnished townhome and single-level model homes, please call

609-924-3884, or visit www.palmersquareresidences.com. The sales center hours are 10-6pm Monday through Friday, and 11am-5pm on Saturday and Sunday.  The sales center is located at 611 Michelle Mews in Princeton.

The Residences at Palmer Square delivers historic charm, modern luxury in downtown Princeton

via BuzzBuzzHome – With The Residences at Palmer Square, you have to start at the very beginning.

The 100-unit bespoke luxury development in downtown Princeton is the culmination of a vision that dawned in the late 1930s.

In the early 1900s, Edgar Palmer first conceived of the Square as a new municipal center with buildings for retail, office and residential use, a hotel, post office and a playhouse that would complement Princeton University, located directly across Nassau Street. The first buildings, running along Palmer Square West, were completed in 1937, and a new phase has been added every decade since.

Palmer Square Management developed the apartments, with extensive design input by the Princeton Regional Planning Board. “The Residences is what I’d call the last piece of the jigsaw puzzle,” said David Newton, Vice President of Palmer Square Management. “The vision was to create a commercial core of Princeton to complement the academic core, and in terms of ground-up development, the residences complete that vision.”

The Square currently consists of 150,000 square feet of office space, 110,000 square feet of upscale retail, the 188-room historic Nassau Inn hotel and more than 1,000 parking spaces in two garages. The Residences at Palmer Square is a carefully crafted array of multi-story townhomes, single-level and duplex condominium flats and rental flats. In designing the stately homes, Minno & Wasko Architects and Planners continued the Colonial Revival style of Thomas Stapleton, the original architect.

FULL ARTICLE

New Multi-Story Townhome Sold at The Residences at Palmer Square in Downtown Princeton

Palmer Square Townhomes Exterior SMALLSale Marks Latest Milestone in Luxury Community’s Success

PRINCETON, NJ, — With the appeal of living in downtown Princeton as strong as ever, Palmer Square Management and The Marketing Directors today announced the sale of a new three-story townhome at The Residences at Palmer Square.  Located at 85 Chambers Street, the one-of-a-kind home features three bedrooms, 3 ½ baths, an elevator and a host of custom finishes and appointments in a soaring 2,940 square-foot design.

The new sale demonstrates the increased interest and activity at The Residences at Palmer Square which features multi-story townhomes, single-level flats and a limited offering of luxury rental residences.  With a peerless downtown Princeton location amidst the more than 40 brand-name stores, boutiques, restaurants and specialty food shops within Palmer Square and directly across Nassau Street from Princeton University, The Residences at Palmer Square has cemented its place as one of the most desirable residential lifestyle developments in the region.

“Each new sale reflects the broad range appeal of these stunning homes, custom materials, and incomparable location,” said Adrienne Albert, CEO of The Marketing Directors, the community’s exclusive sales and marketing agent.   “With more than 32 unique floor plans to choose from, buyers enjoy a virtual custom-home scenario that is successfully meeting their individual needs and tastes.”

Located on Paul Robeson Place between Chambers and Witherspoon Streets, The Residences at Palmer Square completes the vision begun by developer Edgar Palmer in 1937 to create a vibrant, European-style town square for Princeton that would include shops, restaurants and residences as a complement to Princeton University.  Taking over where architect Thomas Stapleton’s original Colonial Revival style left off, Minno & Wasko Architects and Planners of Lambertville, NJ, has created a number of distinctive elevations which expertly complement the brick, Federal-style exteriors and Colonial-era structures of the immediate Palmer Square environment.

The community features two- and three-bedroom, single-level flats ranging from 1,623 to 3,195 square feet of living space, priced from $1,590,000.  Multi-level, two- and three-bedroom townhomes range from 2,516 to 4,476 square feet and are priced from $1,640,000 to $2,950,000.

A limited collection of rental residences is also available, with two- and three-bedroom floor plans ranging from 1,417 to 3,195 square feet of living space.  The rental residences are available with monthly rents starting at $4,543.

Steel and concrete construction offers the highest level of quality and privacy, while terraces in many homes and lushly-landscaped promenades, courtyards and common areas offer desirable outdoor space.  Homeowners also enjoy indoor parking.

Custom interior features and appointments include private elevators and 10-foot first-floor ceiling heights in townhomes, nine-foot ceilings in condominiums, and tray ceilings in living and dining areas and master bedrooms.  Extensive millwork, including striking fireplaces with marble hearths, pocket doors and elegant crown moldings, add style and elegance to the homes.  Gourmet kitchens are notable for maple cabinets, granite countertops and Viking stainless steel appliance packages, while spa-like Master baths feature whirlpool tubs, double sinks, glass showers, and marble countertops.

Ideally situated across from the main entrance of Princeton University, Palmer Square allows residents to enjoy Princeton’s cherished suburban ambiance, award-winning public and private schools, renowned university attributes, and world-class entertainment and cultural offerings.  NJ TRANSIT access to New York and Philadelphia (and beyond) is only a short walk from The Residences at Palmer Square, and businesses and shopping venues of the nearby Route 1 corridor are also within easy reach.

For upscale dining and shopping, Palmer Square features more than 40 brand-name stores, boutiques, restaurants and specialty food shops, as well as the historic Nassau Inn — all ideally situated in a pedestrian-friendly setting.

For additional information on The Residences at Palmer Square and to make a private appointment to view fully-furnished townhome and single-level model homes, please call 609-924-3884, or visit http://www.palmersquareresidences.com. The sales center hours are 10-6pm Monday through Friday, and 11am-5pm on Saturday and Sunday.  The sales center is located at 112 Victoria Mews in Princeton.

Princeton: From college town to boomtown

New York Post

via  Adam Bonislawski/ The New York Post

 

Jim and Judy Betlyon with one their three sons, Casey, outside their Palmer Square townhouse in Princeton, NJ. Photo: Christian Johnston

Jim and Judy Betlyon with one their three sons, Casey, outside their Palmer Square townhouse in Princeton, NJ.
Photo: Christian Johnston

PRINCETON, NJ, might not seem the likeliest spot for those in search of an urban vibe, but new developments and a walkable core have buyers — including former New Yorkers — flocking to this college town for a taste of city living.

According to numbers from Maura Mills, an agent with Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty, this year Princeton has seen an average of 28 properties per month go into contract — up from 27 a month in 2013 and 22 per month in 2012. The average sales price, meanwhile, has climbed to $980,234 — up from $933,745 in 2013 and $867,708 in 2012.

And at the high end of the market, sales are accelerating even more quickly. In 2012 and 2013, Princeton saw, respectively, 66 and 92 sales close on properties over $1 million. In the first eight months of 2014, 82 such deals have closed — putting the city on pace for 123 $1-million-plus sales on the year. These properties have averaged 86 days on the market in 2014, compared to 101 days in 2013 and 127 in 2012.

Of course, Princeton is no stranger to well-heeled buyers. A little over an hour from Manhattan either by car or NJ Transit, this town of around 30,000 has long been a popular, and pricey, community — both for commuters and residents associated with the namesake university.

Area real estate agents have observed a change, however, in where many of these high-end buyers are choosing to settle. In recent years, growing demand for in-town properties, including several new apartment and townhouse projects, has shifted the city’s center of gravity.

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Palmer Square is an office, retail and residential development near Princeton University. Photo: Taylor Photo

Palmer Square is an office, retail and residential development near Princeton University.
Photo: Taylor Photo

Proximity to downtown amenities was a key factor in the decision by Jim Betlyon and his wife, Judy, to three years ago buy a three-bedroom townhouse in the city’sPalmer Squaredevelopment. This collection of office, retail and residential spaces is close to the university.

After raising their three sons on 20 acres in nearby Bucks County, Pa., the couple decided they wanted something more centrally located.

“A city-living environment was appealing to us,” Betlyon says. “We knew we wanted to be right in town where we could just jump out and get a quart of milk in the morning or go to dinner without having to get in the car.”

Not exactly a development in a hurry, Palmer Square has been under construction since the 1930s, with new parts added each decade. In 2010, the complex — which includes a 188-room hotel along with 150,000 square feet of office space and 110,000 square feet of retail — opened the Residences at Palmer Square. The newer project includes 60 two- and three-bedroom rentals (starting at $4,258 per month), 23 two- and three-bedroom condos ($1.23 to $2.56 million) and 17 two- and three-bedroom townhomes ($1.64 to $2.95 million).

Daniel Scheid and his wife, Mary Beth, both retirees, purchased a three-bedroom townhouse at Palmer Square in 2010 to be closer to their daughter, who is married to a Princeton University professor. The couple previously lived in an 1830s rowhouse in Philadelphia’s Center City.

“We liked that urban environment,” Daniel says of their former Philadelphia home. Palmer Square offers a similar experience, he says, albeit on a slightly smaller scale.

“The number of [amenities] are far greater in Philadelphia, of course.” But, he notes, his new home is within easy walking distance of offerings like restaurants, coffee shops, museums and theaters.

FULL ARTICLE

From Mayfair to Palmer Square: Self-Described “Corporate Vagabonds” at Home in Princeton

via Linda Arntzenius/Town Topics

2014-07-23_11-59-35As President of ME Global, a global chemical company headquartered in London, England, Dan Scheid and his wife Mary Beth Scheid enjoyed a lifestyle at the center of a bustling city. They lived in Mayfair, in Shepherd’s Market to be precise, and Dan could walk to work. “It was wonderful, my office was right opposite St. James’s Palace,” recalled Dan in a telephone interview from the West Coast where the couple were hiking two hours outside of Seattle before traveling on to Ashville, North Carolina, to visit the John C. Campbell Folk School.

Easy access to everything their environment had to offer was what they were looking for when Dan retired in 2006 and the couple moved back to the United States.

They found it in Philadelphia, in a row house in Center City where, said Mary Beth, they fully expected to stay. But after their daughter Clancy married Princeton professor, David August, the Scheids found themselves spending more and more time in Princeton. The draw had much to do with their three grandchildren Betty, 4, Josie, 2, and Danny, 7 months. The Scheids plans for the future changed.

The Scheids moved into the Residences at Palmer Square in September 2010.

Besides family, one other consideration prompted their choice. Mobility. “We loved our four-story row house in center city, but we realized that mobility and stairs would one day become an issue for us,” said Dan. Even so, they had thought to move to a more convenient home in Philadelphia — until they saw the new steel and concrete construction of luxury multi-story town homes and expansive single-level condominiums taking shape in the center of Princeton.

“As soon as the new residences became available, we were the first ones knocking on the door,” said Dan. “The promise of living in the center of downtown Princeton and being able to walk to everything was very enticing. It was similar to everything we liked about center city.”

Impressed by what they saw, the Scheids walked though numerous homes in various stages of construction and got a good look at the bone structure of each residence.

Their three-story town home on Chambers Street, which also has a basement, is “everything we had hoped for,” said Dan. “Downtown Princeton offers a best-of-both-worlds living environment that few places can match. There’s the ease of a comfortable, small-town existence, but it is coupled with an urban vibrancy and international presence that you usually can’t find outside a big city. Princeton also has the advantage of being convenient to both Philadelphia and New York City. And The Residences at Palmer Square enjoy the best location in Princeton without question. We regularly attend the McCarter Theatre and Princeton University Art Museum, and love being able to walk to all of the restaurants and shops within Palmer Square and around town.”

The Scheids embraced the idea of living in a new-construction home. “The floor plan of the Palmer Square townhome was strikingly similar to our row house, including compatible design details and a classical layout, but with clear advantages,” Dan pointed out. “A brand new home compared to an 1830s building means more efficient space, improved energy efficiency, and fewer maintenance issues.”

And an elevator that takes them right into their apartment will give them the mobility they were concerned about when the time comes. Dan, 66, and Mary Beth, 65, are fit and physically active. They enjoy ballroom dancing at the Suzanne Patterson Center, traveling, music.

Both hail from Jackson, Michigan, where they went to the same high school. “Mary Beth and I met as freshmen; Mary Beth’s older brother was my best friend,” recalled Dan. Their son, Charles, lives in San Francisco and their daughter, Anna, in Amherst, Massachussetts.

The Scheids have made an effort to become part of the community, Dan serves as a trustee of the Historical Society of Princeton. “Being a part of the community was important to us and gave us a reason to make the move now when we are still young and active rather than later,” he said.

One of the best things Mary Beth has found in Princeton is the Newcomers and Friends Club run by the Princeton YWCA, which has about 200 members and serves as an excellent conduit for those new to the town. “I do one activity with the group at least once a week and we have met a lot of couples this way,” she said.

 Princeton Living

Besides access to their growing family, living in Princeton offers other benefits. They find the cost of living in Princeton to be much less than they experienced in London. “It’s comparable to center city Philadelphia.” said Dan. “The big difference in living here is substantially higher taxes of all sorts, property taxes, income and sales taxes combined compared to Philadelphia and elsewhere in Pennsylvania. But when it comes to normal living expenses and food, costs are much the same.1

Located on Paul Robeson Place between Chambers and Witherspoon Streets, The Residences at Palmer Square complete a development project begun by Edgar Palmer in 1937. The new homes were designed along the lines of a European-style town square that would include shops, restaurants and residences. The brick Federal style exteriors are designed to complement existing buildings.

According to a press release, the residential community offers custom interior features and appointments including private elevators, 9- and 10-foot high ceilings and tray ceilings, extensive millwork, fireplaces with marble hearths, pocket doors and elegant crown moldings. Gourmet kitchens have maple cabinets, granite countertops, and Viking stainless steel appliances; spa-like master baths feature whirlpool tubs, double sinks, glass showers, and marble countertops. Many of the homes have their own terraces and there are landscaped promenades, courtyards, and common outdoor areas. There is also indoor parking for residents.

There are 32 different floor plans from two- and three-bedroom, single-level flats, to two- and three-bedroom, multi-level townhouses.

The single level flats have between 1,623 and 4,130 square feet of living space; the townhomes have between 2,622 and 3,084 square feet. The flats range in price from $1.245 to $3.4 million; the townhomes from $1.775 to $2,195 million.

A limited number of rental residences are also available, with two- and three-bedroom floor plans ranging from 1,623 to 3,195 square feet of living space monthly rents starting at S4.800.

For more information on The Residences at Palmer Square, call (609) 924-3884, or visit www.palmersquareresidences.com.